Kay Hallahan

Kay Hallahan

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    Aboriginal language course for schools in 1993

    16/12/1992 12:00 AM
     
     
    Aboriginal languages facing extinction will be revived next year through a language program involving more than 1,000 Western Australian students.
     
    Education Minister Kay Hallahan today announced that 15 Government schools had been selected to offer an Aboriginal language in 1993.
     
    And by 1995, more than 2,000 students would be learning an Aboriginal language at school.
     
    "In some communities, only a handful of elders still speak the traditional language. By introducing the languages into schools an important part of Aboriginal heritage will be passed on to younger generations," Mrs Hallahan said.
     
    She said many non-Aboriginal students would learn the languages, which would raise awareness and respect for Aboriginal culture.
     
    In 1993, more than 20 languages would be taught in schools in the Kimberley, Pilbara, Murchison and South West.
     
    Schools involved were Carey Park PS in Bunbury; Mullewa DHS; Karratha Education Support Unit; La Grange Remote Community School; Looma Remote Community School in Camballin; Wananami Remote Community School and Broome PS.
     
    They would join eight schools already offering languages - Mt Magnet DHS; Meekatharra DHS; Roebourne PS; South Hedland PS; Marble Bar PS; One Arm Point Remote Community School; Fitzroy Crossing DHS; and Halls Creek DHS.
     
    Mrs Hallahan also announced a new ground breaking book on teaching Aboriginal languages would be distributed to schools.
     
    The 141-page book - believed to be an Australian first - has taken three years to produce.