David Templeman

David Templeman

Minister for the Environment; Climate Change; Peel

    Plant a native tree on National Tree Day

    27/07/2008 12:00 AM
     

    Environment Minister David Templeman celebrated Planet Ark’s National Tree Day today by joining volunteers in planting some of the 130,000 natives planned for a new $1million artificial wetland and parkland in Cannington.

     

    “National Tree Day is a wonderful opportunity to promote the benefits of planting native trees and to engage the community - especially young people - in caring for our unique environment,” Mr Templeman said.

     

     “Local native plants have a better chance of survival as they have adapted over millions of years to the conditions in their area, and they require less water.

    “Planting a diverse range of local native trees and shrubs is also the best way to support the local native wildlife in the area, providing the food, shelter and habitat that they are best suited to.

     

    “However, it is important to be cautious when selecting trees and shrubs to plant as Australian native plants that do not naturally occur in a region can be regarded as weeds.”

     

    The Minister said the new Wharf Street wetland would become home to an array of specially selected native plants.

     

    The wetland flanks 365m of the Canning River and will filter stormwater from the Wharf Street main drain along a 600m flow path before it enters the river.

     

    “Improving water quality entering the river will reduce the risk of algal blooms and fish deaths, while restoring degraded areas by planting native species will provide new habitats for wildlife,” Mr Templeman said.

     

    “This wetland is located less than one kilometre downstream from the award-winning Liege Street Wetland, where monitoring shows that nutrients entering the Canning River have been reduced by up to one third.

     

    “Filtering features at the Wharf Street Wetland include vegetated, open water and subsurface flow areas, rock riffles, an infiltration swale - or depression that filters out particulates - and rock cascades to the river.

     

    “The community will be able to enjoy the area more, with new amenities such as picnic and barbeque areas, shelters, pathways, seating, bins, and a viewing platform.”

     

    The Minister said the State Government was providing up to $1million for the project, while the City of Canning was providing in-kind support for construction and maintenance.

     

    Minister's office - 9220 5050