Hon Colin Barnett MEc MLA

Hon Colin Barnett MEc MLA

Former Premier; Minister for Tourism; Science

Hon Helen Morton MLC

Hon Helen Morton MLC

Former Minister for Mental Health; Disability Services; Child Protection

    Plan to expand regional mental health services

    7/12/2015 2:05 PM
     
    • Mental health, alcohol and other drug services expanded across regional areas
    • Community feedback sets priorities for the regions
    • Enhanced local services to reduce the need for travel 

    Regional areas are a key focus of a substantial State Government agenda to expand the delivery of mental health, alcohol and drug services across Western Australia over the next decade.

     

    Announcing the Western Australian Mental Health, Alcohol and Other Drug Services Plan 2015-2025: Better Choices. Better Lives, Premier Colin Barnett said the plan confronted the systemic changes needed to deliver connected, efficient and high-quality services in the short, medium and longer terms.

     

    "This plan is the realisation of the principal recommendation of the 2012 Stokes Review," Mr Barnett said.

     

    "It outlines a clear path from where we are now to where we need to be to provide co-ordinated and best-practice contemporary mental health care and drug and alcohol services for all West Australians.

     

    "This will include expanding community alcohol and other drug service hubs that can provide outreach services across regional areas."

     

    Mental Health Minister Helen Morton said the plan was the next step in the most complete overhaul of mental health services ever undertaken in WA.

     

    "Creating a ministerial portfolio for mental health, establishing the Mental Health Commission and its amalgamation with the Drug and Alcohol Office, the Suicide Prevention Strategy 2020, the new Mental Health Act 2014 and record expenditure on mental health services have all been groundwork for this plan," Mrs Morton said.

     

    "The plan is the blueprint.  It tells us the types of mental health and drug and alcohol services we need, the optimal mix of those services, where those services need to be located and what levels of service need to be provided."

     

    The Minister said the draft plan, released for consultation in December 2014, had been further informed by 19 community consultation forums involving more than 2,000 individuals and organisations, 64 written submissions and 245 online survey responses.

     

    Feedback from rural and remote areas highlighted challenges related to transport and geographical distance to services, the need for culturally secure services and programs for Aboriginal people, and the high proportion of children and young people in some areas, with the associated need for early intervention.

     

    "The finalised plan addresses these concerns and also prioritises improving State-wide access to specialised services for eating disorders, perinatal and neuropsychiatric disorders and for Aboriginal mental health," Mrs Morton said.

     

    "Improving earlier and easier access to local services, will help people to stay well in their community with family support and reduce the number of those who need to be disconnected from their community and admitted for acute and more costly hospital care.

     

    "The plan calls for a six-fold increase in the level of personalised community support services, double the number of community-based clinical treatment hours and a three-fold increase in the number of community-based beds over the next 10 years.

     

    "The development of subacute centres is an area where the State Government has already done a considerable amount of work.

     

    "By the end of 2017 we plan to have an extra 38 community-based subacute beds available across the State with the addition of 10-beds in Rockingham, six beds each in Kalgoorlie, Broome and Karratha and 10 beds in Bunbury.  These additional beds will mean an extra 500 people can be admitted for subacute treatment every year.

     

    "Other services in development in line with the plan include the police mental health co-response trial; dedicated youth mental health programs; specialised State-wide services for eating disorders and also gender diversity; and a one-stop-shop online directory to help people easily navigate to the services they need."

     

    The plan also calls for the number of hospital beds for people with acute mental illness and for medically supervised alcohol and drug withdrawal to almost double by the end of 2025.  Many of these beds would be redistributed to regional hospitals.

     

    "The plan identifies the need for a comprehensive strategy to reduce methamphetamine use -something the State Government is already working on in concert with the Federal Government - and also identifies the need to progress options for compulsory treatment for people seriously affected by alcohol and other drug addiction," the Minister said.

     

    "All levels of government and private and not-for-profit sectors, consumers, families and carers must collaborate to achieve these much-needed changes.

     

    "In particular, the plan will guide decisions about the best options and leverage investment in mental health services across all State Government agencies jointly with the Commonwealth and in conjunction with the private and not-for-profit sectors."

     

    Fact File

    • Since its election the current State Government has increased funding for mental health services by 77 per cent
    • For 2015-16, the State Government has allocated funding of $836.8 million for the mental health, alcohol and other drug sector
    • The Western Australian, Alcohol and Other Drug Services Plan 2015-2025 (plan) and more information, is available at http://www.mhc.wa.gov.au  
    • The Stokes Review, was jointly commissioned by the Mental Health Commission and the Department of Health in November 2011, with a view to ensuring that effective services, policies and practices are in place and consistently implemented. The review revealed a number of issues and challenges for mental health care in WA and made 117 recommendations listed under nine theme areas
    • The plan outlines the investment required to achieve the optimal mix and level of mental health, alcohol and other drug services in the short (by the end of 2017), medium (by the end of 2020) and long term (by the end of 2025) to best meet the identified needs of the population
    • The plan outlines the types and levels of services required across the State but does not pre-determine who should fund or provide them. Implementation will be subject to the State's normal budgetary processes and, as is the case with current services, will require input from the private and not-for-profit sectors and the Commonwealth
    • The plan was developed by the Mental Health Commission, the former Drug and Alcohol Office, with the input from the Department of Health, stakeholders, consumers, carers and families, expert reference groups and sector organisations
    • A forensic component of the plan addressing the mental health needs of people in contact with the criminal justice system was developed in consultation with the Department of Corrective Services and the Department of Health
    • Regional forums were held in Albany, Broome, Bunbury, Geraldton, Kalgoorlie, Karratha, Kununurra, Northam and Roebourne 

    Premier's office - 6552 5000

    Mental Health Minister's office - 6552 6900

     

    PLAN BY REGION - KEY PRIORITIES BY THE END OF 2025

     

    GOLDFIELDS

    • Significant increases in community-based mental health (to 133,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) and drug and alcohol support services (to 9,000 hours per year by the end of 2025). These can include peer support, employment, education and training programs, housing, social opportunities and help with daily living tasks
    • Increase community-based clinical treatment services for mental health (to 99,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) and alcohol and other drug problems (to 54,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) including the expansion of drug and alcohol service hubs and increased outreach services to outlying areas
    • For the Northern and Remote Region (includes Goldfields, Kimberley, Pilbara and Mid-West) these increases in community-based clinical treatment services for mental health represent a 151 per cent increase on current levels and for alcohol and other drugs a 168 per cent increase
    • Double the number of community-based residential rehabilitation beds for drug and alcohol problems (from 10 to 20) and provide extra community-based beds (two beds) for low medical withdrawal
    • 21 community-based mental health beds, including six community subacute step-up, step-down beds already announced for Kalgoorlie-Boulder. The six community step-up, step-down beds could see an approximate 80 admissions per year
    • Increase mental health hospital and hospital-in-the-home beds (from six to 25 beds) which will allow about 530 extra mental health admissions per year.  Three additional hospital beds for medically supervised complex alcohol and other drug withdrawal will be provided and will allow for about 110 additional admissions per year
    • Kalgoorlie currently has six mental health beds within Kalgoorlie Regional Hospital (rather than seven beds as outlined in the plan as at June 30, 2014). The difference in numbers is because of the reclassification of one bed within the system in early 2015. These types of reclassifications happen infrequently and can sometimes appear to result in small discrepancies.

    KIMBERLEY

    • Significant increases in community-based mental health (to 173,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) and drug and alcohol support services (to 9,000 hours per year by the end of 2025). These can include peer support, employment, education and training programs, housing, social opportunities and help with daily living tasks
    • Increase community-based clinical treatment services for mental health (to 134,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) and alcohol and other drug problems (to 72,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) including the expansion of drug and alcohol service hubs in the Kimberley and increased outreach services to outlying areas
    • For the Northern and Remote Region (includes Goldfields, Kimberley, Pilbara and Mid-West), these increases in community-based clinical treatment services for mental health represent a 151 per cent increase on current levels and for alcohol and other drugs a 168 per cent increase
    • Provide two community-based beds for alcohol and other drug low medical withdrawal beds by the end of 2025
    • 27 community-based mental health beds, including six community subacute step-up, step-down beds already announced for Broome. The six community step-up, step-down beds could see an approximate 80 admissions per year
    • Increase mental health hospital and hospital-in-the-home beds (from 14 beds to 31 beds) which will allow about 480 extra mental health admissions per year.  Four additional hospital beds for medically supervised complex alcohol and other drug withdrawal will allow for about 140 additional admissions per year.

    PILBARA

    • Significant increases in community-based mental health (to 149,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) and drug and alcohol support services (to 8,000 hours per year by the end of 2025). These can include peer support, employment, education and training programs, housing, social opportunities and help with daily living tasks
    • Increase alcohol and other drug safe places for intoxicated people from 34 to 46 beds
    • Increase community-based clinical treatment services for mental health (to 113,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) and alcohol and other drug problems (to 68,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) including the expansion of drug and alcohol service hubs and increased outreach services to outlying areas
    • For the Northern and Remote Region (includes Goldfields, Kimberley, Pilbara and Mid-West), these increases in community-based clinical treatment services for mental health represent a 151 per cent increase on current levels and for alcohol and other drugs a 168 per cent increase
    • 22 community-based mental health beds, including six community subacute step-up, step-down beds planned for Karratha. The six community step-up, step-down beds could see an approximate 80 admissions per year
    • Increase the number of residential rehabilitation beds for drug and alcohol problems (from 18 to 27) and provide two additional community-based beds for low medical withdrawal
    • Increase mental health hospital and hospital-in-the-home beds by 29 which will allow about 810 extra mental health admissions per year. Four additional hospital beds for medically supervised complex alcohol and other drug withdrawal will allow for about 140 additional admissions per year. 

    MID-WEST

    • Significant increases in community-based mental health (to 184,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) and drug and alcohol support services (to 7,000 hours per year by the end of 2025). These can include peer support, employment, education and training programs, housing, social opportunities and help with daily living tasks
    • Increase community-based clinical treatment services for mental health (to 131,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) and alcohol and other drug problems (to 68,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) including the expansion of drug and alcohol service hubs and increased outreach services to outlying areas
    • For the Northern and Remote Region (includes Goldfields, Kimberley, Pilbara and Mid-West) these increases in community-based clinical treatment services for mental health represent a 151 per cent increase on current levels and for alcohol and other drugs a 168 per cent increase
    • Increase community-based mental health beds (from 14 to 33), double (to 24) drug and alcohol residential rehabilitation beds and provide two community-based beds for low medical withdrawal
    • Provide 35 mental health hospital and hospital-in-the-home beds which will allow about 980 extra mental health admissions per year.  Four hospital beds for medically supervised complex alcohol and other drug withdrawal will allow for about 140 additional admissions per year.  

    GREAT SOUTHERN

    • Significant increases in community-based mental health (to 138,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) and drug and alcohol support services (to 6,000 hours per year by the end of 2025). These can include peer support, employment, education and training programs, housing, social opportunities and help with daily living tasks
    • Increase community-based clinical treatment services for mental health (to 92,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) and alcohol and other drug problems (to 47,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) including the expansion of drug and alcohol service hubs and increased outreach services to outlying areas
    • For the Southern Country Region (includes Great Southern, South-West and Wheatbelt), these increases in community-based clinical treatment services for mental health represent a 108 per cent increase on current levels and for alcohol and other drugs a 373 per cent increase
    • Increase community-based mental health beds (from 11 to 26), drug and alcohol residential rehabilitation beds (to 17) and provide two community-based  beds for low medical withdrawal
    • Increase mental health hospital and hospital-in-the-home beds (from 16 beds to 25) which will allow about 250 extra mental health admissions per year.  Three extra hospital beds for medically supervised complex alcohol and other drug withdrawal will allow for about 110 additional admissions per year.  

     

    SOUTH-WEST 

    • Major increases in community-based mental health (to 406,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) and drug and alcohol support services (to 20,000 hours per year by the end of 2025). These can include peer support, employment, education and training programs, housing, social opportunities and help with daily living tasks
    • Major increases in community-based clinical treatment services for mental health (to 280,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) and alcohol and other drug problems (to 147,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) including the expansion of drug and alcohol service hubs and increased outreach services to outlying areas
    • For the Southern Country Region (includes Great Southern, South-West and Wheatbelt) these increases in community-based clinical treatment services for mental health represent a 108 per cent increase on current levels and for alcohol and other drugs a 373 per cent increase
    • Increase community-based mental health beds (from 25 to 74)
    • Provide 55 drug and alcohol residential rehabilitation beds and three community-based beds for low medical withdrawal
    • Increase mental health hospital and hospital-in-the-home beds (from 27 beds to 77) which will allow about 1,400 extra mental health admissions per year.  Eight additional hospital beds for medically supervised complex alcohol and other drug withdrawal will allow about 290 extra admissions per year. 

    WHEATBELT

    • Significant increases in community-based mental health (to 175,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) and drug and alcohol support services (to 7,000 hours per year by the end of 2025). These can include peer support, employment, education and training programs, housing, social opportunities and help with daily living tasks
    • Increase community-based clinical treatment services for mental health (to 118,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) and alcohol and other drug problems (to 61,000 hours per year by the end of 2025) including the expansion of drug and alcohol service hubs and increased outreach services to outlying areas
    • For the Southern Country Region (includes Great Southern, South-West and Wheatbelt), these increases in community-based clinical treatment services for mental health represent a 108 per cent increase on current levels and for alcohol and other drugs a 373 per cent increase
    • Provide community-based mental health beds (32); drug and alcohol residential rehabilitation beds (23); and two community-based beds for low medical withdrawal
    • Increase mental health hospital and hospital-in-the-home beds by 34 which will allow about 950 additional mental health admissions per year. Three extra hospital beds for medically supervised complex alcohol and other drug withdrawal will allow about 110 additional admissions per year.